Newcastle Airport Special Assistance Facilities

Newcastle airport has a number of facilities for disabled passengers to aid their comfort and ease of travel. These facilities include:

  • Assistance from when they reach the airport to be collected from designated points
  • Free wheelchair use available on request.
  • Disabled toilets and Changing Places facilities
  • Ambulifts available for access to aircraft.
  • Text-phone available opposite information desk.
  • Help to reach connecting flights by given assistance both inside and outside the plane if you need it
Mobility equipment

Mobility equipment is allowed on the plane and the airport will ensure it stays safe during the flight. They will do whatever is necessary to carry it safely such as dismantle if need be. If you would like to use this service, you need to contact the airline at least 48 hours before your travel. You could also email the airport too at this address: prm@newcastleinternational.co.uk

You would need to provide the following information:

  • What type of mobility aid it is
  • Its manufacturer
  • The battery type
  • Instruction manual on how to disable it
  • Lastly, you need to give the date and flight number of your travel

Assistance dogs are welcome at Newcastle Airport to travel both inbound and outbound flights. Ask a member of staff if you have any queries about this and they will be able to help you further.

Hidden Disabilities Lanyards are available for those passengers suffering from conditions such as autism, dementia and mental health. The lanyard will subtly alert a member of staff that certain passengers might need more help or assistance. They are absolutely free and you can get one from the Airport Duty Managers desk or from Passabfer Assistance desk at the main terminal.

assistance is available

Tips for Disabled Air Passengers

  • You should compare the arrangements offered by different airlines before making your booking and be sure to check whether the cost of any special assistance is included in the price of your ticket.
  • Inform your airline of your particular needs in good time and check the policy of your airline if you wish to remain in your own wheelchair to the aircraft door rather than transfer to an airline wheelchair at check-in.
  • Remember that there are often long walking distances within airports and that this may cause you to require assistance. Pre-arranging any necessary assistance will ensure that it’s available and that no time is lost in waiting for it to be arranged once you arrive at the airport.

Useful Articles

Assistance isn’t just focused on those with reduced mobility – what about those with hearing or sight loss, ASD or another medical condition?

Here are three articles written by Airport Parking Shop that cover the above, based on their own research conducted into UK Airports and what they do to support all of their passengers with special assistance requirements;

  • Autism in Airports
    discusses the difficulties parents of children with ASD face, alongside helpful hints on how to make the experience more pleasent.
  • Flying with Diabetes
    looks into the common issues faced by those mainly travelling with Type 1 Diabetes and what passengers think needs to be done.
  • Using Airports with Sensory Impairments
    addresses the problems one might face when travelling if blind or deaf and what support UK Airports offer for these passengers.